How to not fail ever again

We’re very much into the New Year now and thinking long and hard about ourselves and what we can improve, don’t lie you know you are! I’m doing it too to some extent because it’s kind of hard not to when everyone else is doing the same thing.

It makes me kinda sad that we only think about others at Christmas, and only about our own self-improvement when a New Year begins. But nevertheless, any consideration for the latter it’s a very good thing in my eyes. We should always be working to improve, get better, reach goals — but quite often the fear of failure stops us from taking even the first small step.

Similarly, the trick of keeping up your consistent new workout regime or improved diet plan can fall to failure because of our anxiety that we won’t be able to reach our goal. This is no small part why I’m creating Mentovo, to give people the support they need to achieve whatever it is they want to (in the realms of wellbeing and self-improvement).

So how do we remove that fear of failure that makes us fail over and over? It’s really quite simple. We stop being afraid of failure.Indulge me for a second, because I believe this is the key. If we are afraid of failing then what does that lead to, usually an acceptance that we will always continue to fail and so what’s the point in trying? But if we simply reframe ‘failure’ to mean something else we could vastly change this vicious cycle.

Indulge me for a second, because I believe this is the key. If we are afraid of failing then what does that lead to, usually an acceptance that we will always continue to fail and so what’s the point in trying? But if we simply reframe ‘failure’ to mean something else we could vastly change this vicious cycle.

Here’s an example, I have failed at keeping up a consistent workout routine for approximately 6 years. I have lifted weights, ran, swam, played games, jumped about in gymnastics and much in between and there is one thing that has always been true: I have failed to be completely consistent. Stopping and restarting due to injury, anxiety, and even depression and outright laziness.

But I will tell you one thing that has always been constant. I keep coming back for more. I have certain aspirations for my body, and over these past 6 years that hasn’t changed one bit. The methods and specific aims may have changed but I have always wanted to improve the ability of my body and having worked on it — albeit on and off — for 6 years I have made considerable improvements in my knowledge and ability.

So when I look at my failures I prefer to consider them as lessons learned as they are but a hiccup in a long journey which is the most important thing of all, that we learn a lesson and continue the journey. So I say don’t be afraid to fail, allow for it to happen and consider it as important as the successes because either way you learned something new about yourself.Instead, embrace it, cut yourself some slack, and get back on the horse.

Instead, embrace it, cut yourself some slack, and get back on the horse.